Tag: 1967

I’d Love To Turn You On: Classical And Avant-Garde Music That Inspired The Sixties Counter-Culture (El Records)

I’d Love To Turn You On: Classical And Avant-Garde Music That Inspired The Counterculture offers a fascinating peek behind the curtain of the artists and musicians that inspired the British underground in the late 1960s.

James Carr, “A Losing Game”

A fine slab of Memphis soul from a brilliant but doomed singer.

Gene Clark: Gene Clark Sings For You/The Rose Garden: A Trip Through The Garden (Omnivore)

Two recently released collections document what former Byrds guitarist Gene Clark was doing immediately after leaving the band. One collection finds him sorting out ideas on tape, the other highlights his willingness to work with a young group. While these recordings are rough and probably more for the devoted Byrds fans, they do provide an interesting look into an artist’s creative process.

Gene Clark: Gene Clark Sings For You/The Rose Garden: A Trip Through The Garden (Omnivore)

Two recently released collections document what former Byrds guitarist Gene Clark was doing immediately after leaving the band. One collection finds him sorting out ideas on tape, the other highlights his willingness to work with a young group. While these recordings are rough and probably more for the devoted Byrds fans, they do provide an interesting look into an artist’s creative process.

The Beach Boys: 1967-Sunshine Tomorrow 2: The Studio Sessions (Capitol Records)

The end of the year always finds The Beach Boys gifting their fans with dives into their vast studio and live archives. This year’s offering serves as a companion to the superb 1967-Sunshine Tomorrow compilation, and though it’s probably one of the less essential offerings in the ongoing series, it still contains a few moments that make it worthwhile.

The Beach Boys: 1967-Sunshine Tomorrow 2: The Studio Sessions (Capitol Records)

The end of the year always finds The Beach Boys gifting their fans with dives into their vast studio and live archives. This year’s offering serves as a companion to the superb 1967-Sunshine Tomorrow compilation, and though it’s probably one of the less essential offerings in the ongoing series, it still contains a few moments that make it worthwhile.

The Zodiac: Cosmic Sounds (él Records)

This mysterious record appeared in 1967, and with its cheesy sound effects and pretentious narration, it’s a record that’s impossible not to laugh at. But scratch the surface and you’ll find that this anonymous little record was actually the work of some of the finest musicians of the era and has since become a legend in its own right.

The Zodiac: Cosmic Sounds (él Records)

This mysterious record appeared in 1967, and with its cheesy sound effects and pretentious narration, it’s a record that’s impossible not to laugh at. But scratch the surface and you’ll find that this anonymous little record was actually the work of some of the finest musicians of the era and has since become a legend in its own right.

Song Of The Day: The Monks, “I’m Watching You”

Taken from the Third Man Records release, Hamburg Recordings 1967.

The Beach Boys: 1967: Sunshine Tomorrow (Capitol Records)

1967 wasn’t a good year for The Beach Boys, and it especially wasn’t good for Brian Wilson’s psyche. But the year did produce one of their greatest albums, the highly underrated Wild Honey. This two-disc collection examines the lesser-explored post-Smile Beach Boys era, even though the biggest selling point of this generous rarities collection deserved to stay unreleased.