Tag: Blues

Stone The Crows: Teenage Licks/Ontinuous Performance (Angel Air)

The final installment of the Stone The Crows reissue series finds the band carrying on in the face of adversity and gruesome tragedy, resulting in some fine blues rock.

3AM Eternal: Screamin’ Jay Hawkins, “Frenzy!” (1957)

Gotta love the frenetic energy of wild man Screamin’ Jay Hawkins….

Dr. John: The ATCO/Atlantic Singles 1968-1974 (Omnivore Recordings)

This compilation rounds up all of the single releases from the first half of beloved New Orleans musician Dr. John, and it highlights the foundations of what would become a remarkable career.

Dr. John: The ATCO/Atlantic Singles 1968-1974 (Omnivore Recordings)

This compilation rounds up all of the single releases from the first half of beloved New Orleans musician Dr. John, and it highlights the foundations of what would become a remarkable career.

3AM Eternal: Nick Cave Featuring The Bad Seeds, “Saint Huck” (1984)

Nick Cave’s post-Birthday Party debut album proved that he was still very in touch with the darker side of life. We don’t recommend listening to this song in the dark.

Stone The Crows: Stone The Crows/Ode To John Law (Angel Air)

Stone The Crows was a short-lived British blues rock band, and this twofer, compiling their first two albums, documents a young band with a lot of power and promise.

Stone The Crows: Stone The Crows/Ode To John Law (Angel Air)

Stone The Crows was a short-lived British blues rock band, and this twofer, compiling their first two albums, documents a young band with a lot of power and promise.

3AM Eternal: Sister Rosetta Tharpe “This Train” (Date Unknown)

A fine Gospel number for this Sunday morning courtesy of the Godmother of Rock and Roll. Enjoy it! (i know you will.)

Rory Gallagher: Irish Tour ’74 (Full Cork Show) (Eagle Rock)

A classic blues-rock album sees a 40th anniversary reissue, both in an expanded album version and a super-deluxe multi-disc box set. New fans, start here.

3AM Eternal: Thornetta Davis “Try To Remember” (1996)

This week we’re examining some of esteemed independent label Sub Pop’s diverse attempts at freeing themselves of the Grunge image they at one time insisted on being. First up: their lone R&B album.