Tag: 1992

k.d. lang: Ingénue: 25th Anniversary Edition (Nonesuch Records)

k.d. lang’s 1992 album Ingénue was her attempt at a pop crossover, and it succeeded beyond all expectations. This twenty-fifth anniversary deluxe edition is skimpy and frustrating, but it doesn’t change the fact that Ingénue is both one of her finest albums of her career and one of the best albums of the 1990s.

Various Artists: Singles: Deluxe Edition (Legacy Recordings)

Some thoughts on the bittersweet, unfortunately timed deluxe reissue of the Singles soundtrack.

Various Artists: Singles: Deluxe Edition (Legacy Recordings)

Some thoughts on the bittersweet, unfortunately timed deluxe reissue of the Singles soundtrack.

John Cale: Fragments Of A Rainy Season (Domino)

John Cale’s 1992 live album, Fragments Of A Rainy Season, was an experiment in performing his material in true solo fashion–him onstage, alone with just his guitar or piano. It was a calculated risk, and one that resulted in one of his finest albums to date.

John Cale: Fragments Of A Rainy Season (Domino)

John Cale’s 1992 live album, Fragments Of A Rainy Season, was an experiment in performing his material in true solo fashion–him onstage, alone with just his guitar or piano. It was a calculated risk, and one that resulted in one of his finest albums to date.

BOOK EXCERPT: Never Critique Your Friends, by Everett True

We are pleased to present an exclusive excerpt from Everett True’s forthcoming book, Electrical Storm. In this powerful excerpt, we learn what happened when True critiqued his friends in the band Lush.

Betty Boo: Grrr! It’s Betty Boo (Deluxe Edition) (Cherry Pop)

The sultry, sassy pop on Betty Boo’s sophomore album, Grrr! It’s Betty Boo was superior, intelligent dance pop that promised a great future for this young, talented woman. Shame it didn’t happen that way; still, this is a fine reminder of just how special Betty Boo was.

Betty Boo: Grrr! It’s Betty Boo (Deluxe Edition) (Cherry Pop)

The sultry, sassy pop on Betty Boo’s sophomore album, Grrr! It’s Betty Boo was superior, intelligent dance pop that promised a great future for this young, talented woman. Shame it didn’t happen that way; still, this is a fine reminder of just how special Betty Boo was.

3AM Eternal: The Jennifers, “Tomorrow’s Rain” (1991)

A rare treat from a band who would record one record for a major label, find itself dropped, and would regroup themselves to become one of the most popular British bands in the 1990s. Guess who!

3AM Eternal: The Flaming Lips, “Frogs” (1992)

Eyeballs and amphibians and polka dotted toilets, oh my!