Tag: Brian Eno

U2: All That You Can’t Leave Behind: 20th Anniversary Super Deluxe Edition (Island)

After releasing their first major flop, Irish rockers U2 produced an amazing comeback album, a tight, concise album that smartly stripped away the band’s excesses. A lavish new box set captures the excitement of the era where a find band returns to form.

Song Of The Day: Brian Eno & John Cale, “Lay My Love”

The Recoup Song Of The Day for Wednesday, September 9th is “Lay My Love” by Brian Eno & John Cale, taken from the All Saints release Wrong Way Up.

Song Of The Day: Eno/Wobble, “Lockdown”

The Recoup Song Of The Day for Tuesday, September 8th is “Lockdown” by Eno/Wobble, taken from the All Saints release Spinner.

Song Of The Day: Roger Eno and Brian Eno, “Celeste”

The Recoup Song Of The Day for Friday, February 7th is “Celeste” by Roger Eno & Brian Eno, taken from the Deutsche Grammophon release, Mixing Colours.

Laraaji, “Being Here”

Can’t sleep? Laraaji can help you obtain pure relaxation.

The Residents: Commercial Album (New Ralph Too/Cherry Red/MVD Audio)

The Residents’ 1980 album was a fantastic conceptual piece poking fun at pop music that was lighthearted and carefree while never failing to be less than 100% serious in its approach. This expanded reissue offers copious evidence of just how serious they consider it in their legacy.

The Residents: Commercial Album (New Ralph Too/Cherry Red/MVD Audio)

The Residents’ 1980 album was a fantastic conceptual piece poking fun at pop music that was lighthearted and carefree while never failing to be less than 100% serious in its approach. This expanded reissue offers copious evidence of just how serious they consider it in their legacy.

Song Of The Day: Brian Eno, “Kazakhstan”

Taken from the Opal release, Music For Installations.

John Cale: Fragments Of A Rainy Season (Domino)

John Cale’s 1992 live album, Fragments Of A Rainy Season, was an experiment in performing his material in true solo fashion–him onstage, alone with just his guitar or piano. It was a calculated risk, and one that resulted in one of his finest albums to date.

John Cale: Fragments Of A Rainy Season (Domino)

John Cale’s 1992 live album, Fragments Of A Rainy Season, was an experiment in performing his material in true solo fashion–him onstage, alone with just his guitar or piano. It was a calculated risk, and one that resulted in one of his finest albums to date.