Tag: Warner Brothers

The Flaming Lips: Greatest Hits, Vol. 1 (Warner Brothers)

Though this greatest hits package feels somewhat slapped together, it still doesn’t diminish the fact that the music contained within the three discs ranges from some of the weirdest to some of the most beautiful music you will ever hear.

Song Of The Day: Prince, “Mary Weep For Me”

Taken from the forthcoming Warner Brothers release, Piano & A Microphone 1983.

Prince And The Revolution: Purple Rain (Warner Brothers)

In 1984, Prince released Purple Rain, what many consider to be his magnum opus. Shortly before his death, he began working on an archival release–something he seemed reluctant to do–and now, a year after his passing, this lavish set appears, containing an album of outtakes, rare mixes and b-sides, and an astonishing live performance. But does all this bonus material alter the original album’s status as one of the best albums of all time?

Prince And The Revolution: Purple Rain (Warner Brothers)

In 1984, Prince released Purple Rain, what many consider to be his magnum opus. Shortly before his death, he began working on an archival release–something he seemed reluctant to do–and now, a year after his passing, this lavish set appears, containing an album of outtakes, rare mixes and b-sides, and an astonishing live performance. But does all this bonus material alter the original album’s status as one of the best albums of all time?

Anita Kerr: The Five Classic Warner Brothers Albums 1966-1968 (el Records)

Anita Kerr left the comfort of her successful career in Nashville, setting out to Los Angeles to experiment with more contemporary music. The five albums she released under her name for Warner Brothers are fine examples of mid-60s Easy Listening and Sunshine Pop.

Anita Kerr: The Five Classic Warner Brothers Albums 1966-1968 (el Records)

Anita Kerr left the comfort of her successful career in Nashville, setting out to Los Angeles to experiment with more contemporary music. The five albums she released under her name for Warner Brothers are fine examples of mid-60s Easy Listening and Sunshine Pop.

Fleetwood Mac: Tusk (Warner Brothers)

Fleetwood Mac’s double-album behemoth Tusk is a problematic record, tasked with the duty of following up one of the best-selling records of all time. Its material doesn’t quite stand up to the previous album, but then again, how could it?

Fleetwood Mac: Tusk (Warner Brothers)

Fleetwood Mac’s double-album behemoth Tusk is a problematic record, tasked with the duty of following up one of the best-selling records of all time. Its material doesn’t quite stand up to the previous album, but then again, how could it?

The Flaming Lips: Heady Nuggs: 20 Years After Clouds Taste Metallic (Warner Brothers)

This three-disc set is dedicated to exploring the era of Clouds Taste Metallic, the band’s response to their unexpected hit record, “She Don’t Use Jelly,” and finds them refining their weirdness into palpable, accessible numbers. It’s a transitional record in the face of where they would go next, but twenty years on, none of its charm has been lost.

The Flaming Lips: Heady Nuggs: 20 Years After Clouds Taste Metallic (Warner Brothers)

This three-disc set is dedicated to exploring the era of Clouds Taste Metallic, the band’s response to their unexpected hit record, “She Don’t Use Jelly,” and finds them refining their weirdness into palpable, accessible numbers. It’s a transitional record in the face of where they would go next, but twenty years on, none of its charm has been lost.