Tag: Warner Brothers

Dinosaur Jr: Hand It Over (Cherry Red)

Dinosaur Jr ended its tenure as a major label band with 1997’s Hand It Over. Though released with little fanfare, this deluxe edition helps shine a light on what is indeed an underrated jewel of an album.

Dinosaur Jr: Without A Sound (Cherry Red)

Dinosaur Jr released their sixth album Without A Sound less than a year after their previous effort, thanks in part to the allure of commercial success, resulting in a good album that feels slightly off. This reissue offers up the chance for a reevaluation, and in so doing one discovers it wasn’t that bad of an album.

Dinosaur Jr: Where You Been (Cherry Red)

The Grunge boom of 1992 reaped dividends for Dinosaur Jr, who met the new sound with aplomb and delivered a fantastic and still well-regarded album. This two-disc reissue offers an exciting and enjoyable dive into the heady years of when Dinosaur Jr roamed the land.

Dinosaur Jr Green Mind

Dinosaur Jr: Green Mind (Cherry Red)

Dinosaur Jr made their major label debut in 1991 with their fourth album, Green Mind. Though somewhat raw and undercooked, this expanded reissue helps to revitalize the album thanks to quality b-sides and a live disc.

Prince: Originals (NPG Records/Warner Brothers)

The latest in a series of excursions into the legendarily prolific Prince offers up a compelling theme: fifteen songs Prince gave to friends and his protégées. Even though the ubiquity of some of the hits casts a bit of a shadow on Prince’s versions, on the whole this is an interesting look into his talent.

Vince Guaraldi: The Complete Warner Bros.–Seven Arts Recordings (Omnivore)

Vince Guaraldi will eternally be remembered as the man who soundtracked the life and adventures of Charlie Brown. Yet he was a creative talent in his own right, in this two disc collection compiles the final releases of his lifetime for a record company that stubbornly neglected and unfairly treated the brilliant man they had signed.

The Flaming Lips: Greatest Hits, Vol. 1 (Warner Brothers)

Though this greatest hits package feels somewhat slapped together, it still doesn’t diminish the fact that the music contained within the three discs ranges from some of the weirdest to some of the most beautiful music you will ever hear.

Song Of The Day: Prince, “Mary Weep For Me”

Taken from the forthcoming Warner Brothers release, Piano & A Microphone 1983.

Prince And The Revolution: Purple Rain (Warner Brothers)

In 1984, Prince released Purple Rain, what many consider to be his magnum opus. Shortly before his death, he began working on an archival release–something he seemed reluctant to do–and now, a year after his passing, this lavish set appears, containing an album of outtakes, rare mixes and b-sides, and an astonishing live performance. But does all this bonus material alter the original album’s status as one of the best albums of all time?

Anita Kerr: The Five Classic Warner Brothers Albums 1966-1968 (el Records)

Anita Kerr left the comfort of her successful career in Nashville, setting out to Los Angeles to experiment with more contemporary music. The five albums she released under her name for Warner Brothers are fine examples of mid-60s Easy Listening and Sunshine Pop.