Tag: Album Reviews

The Residents: Commercial Album (New Ralph Too/Cherry Red/MVD Audio)

The Residents’ 1980 album was a fantastic conceptual piece poking fun at pop music that was lighthearted and carefree while never failing to be less than 100% serious in its approach. This expanded reissue offers copious evidence of just how serious they consider it in their legacy.

Soul Asylum: While You Were Out/Clam Dip & Other Delights (Omnivore)

Minneapolis rockers Soul Asylum’s third album offered a glimpse of promise for the young band, and soon marked their farewell from the independent rock world. This reissue also includes an odds and ends EP that humorously pay tribute to their new record label.

The Residents: Eskimo (New Ralph Too/Cherry Red/MVD)

Experimental agitators and jokers The Residents set aside their humorous nature for their sixth album, buckling down and creating an amazing and unique ambient record that documented life in an Eskimo tribe. It was a creative gambit, but one that succeeded and resulted in a unique and impressive composition.

Charlie Walker: Close All The Honky-Tonks/Wine, Women, And Walker/Don’t Squeeze My Sharmon/Honky-Tonkin’ With…

Charlie Walker was a hard-working country musician who loved the honky tonk lifestyle, as witnessed by this two CD set of four of his barroom-minded albums.

Tom Brumley & The Buckaroos: Steelin’ The Show (Omnivore Recordings)

Omnivore’s latest excursion into the vast Buck Owens vault features a fantastic look at the work of Tom Brumley, his pedal steel guitarist for the majority of the 1960s.

Third Ear Band: Music From Macbeth (Esoteric)

Director Roman Polanski tapped British progressive collective Third Ear Band to compose the music for Macbeth, his first production after the murder of his wife and friends at the hands of Charles Manson. Through use of improvisation in the blending of old and new musical techniques, they provided the bleak, heavy score the film needed.

The Spinanes: Manos (Merge Records)

The 25th anniversary of one of the best albums of the 1990s is a cause for celebration, and this no-frills reissue does just that.

Les Troubadours Du Roi Baudouin: Missa Luba (él Records)

El Records’ latest box set compiles most of the original studio recordings of the Congolese boys choir Les Troubadours du Roi Bauduoin, and then uses it as a springboard to examine the use of classical music in postwar cinema. At nearly four hours, it is a veritable feast for the ears.

Various Artists: Bob Stanley and Pete Wiggs Present State Of The Union: The American Dream In Crisis 1967-1973 (Ace Records)

This absolutely essential compilation from musicologists and Saint Etienne masterminds Bob Stanley and Pete Wiggs offers a very rare glimpse into how older, mainstream American pop musicians addressed the changing times of the Richard Nixon/Vietnam war era.

The Ghost Of Christmas: Dead Can Dance’s Dionysus

Dead Can Dance returned this year with their best album in 25 years, a haunting and dark oratorio about the god of debauchery. It’s easily one of the best albums of 2018.