Tag: Album Reviews

The Langley Schools Music Project: Innocence & Despair (Bar/None)

In the mid-1970s, Canadian Elementary school teacher Hans Fenge gathered up the students in his school District and recorded them singing contemporary pop songs. Rediscovered and reissued in 2001, this album has since become a cult classic, and has recently been given a well-deserved vinyl reissue.

Martika: Martika’s Kitchen (Reheated Edition) (Cherry Pop)

With a handful of Prince collaborations and plenty of talent on her own, pop singer Martika seemed poised for greatness with her second album. Surprisingly, it was to be her last solo outing; this recent expanded edition highlights that album’s greatness, while feeling like a story that has yet to be completed.

Chris Hillman: The Asylum Years (Omnivore Recordings)

In the mid-1970s, former Byrds guitarist Chris Hillman recorded a pair of albums for Asylum Records, his first proper solo releases. Though they’ve always been low key in his vast discography of work over the past 50 years, this reissue shows that their obscurity is not for lack of quality material.

Felt: Crumbling the Antiseptic Beauty (Cherry Red)

British indie band Felt introduced itself to the world in 1982 with Crumbling the Antiseptic Beauty , a brief but impressive album that, although flawed in some ways, proved to be a quite promising debut.

Precious Wilson: On The Race Track (Hot Shot Records)

Eruption front woman Precious Wilson launched her solo career with a fine record that blended disco with more progressive R&B and pop sounds, resulting in a superb, confident debut album.

Spacemen 3: Dreamweapon (Space Age Recordings)

In 1988, British psych rock band Spacemen3 was invited to perform in the lobby of a London art centre. The band provided a 45 minute drone, which when released was labeled as contemporary sitar and music, even though they used no sitars that night. This set offers that performance and additional tracks highlights the more experimental side of one of modern psych rock’s most important groups.

Andrew Ridgeley: Son Of Albert: Expanded Edition (Cherry Pop)

In 1990, Andrew Ridgeley, the other half of British pop duo Wham!, released his first–and last–solo album. Critically panned at the time, this reissue takes a second look at one of pop music’s most misaligned releases.

Tim Buckley: Venice Mating Call (Manifesto)

In September 1969, legendary singer/songwriter Tim Buckley would introduce the world to his new hybrid of jazz and folk during a residency at Los Angeles’s legendary Troubadour club. This new two-disc collection captures Buckley in fine form as he performs his then-new album, Happy Sad and what would become his most difficult work, 1970s Lorca.

America: Heritage: Home Recordings/Demos 1970-1973 (Omnivore Recordings)

In the late 60s. three American teenagers living in England formed a folk-rock trio. Naming themselves after their homeland, they quickly became one of the biggest bands of the 1970s. This collection captures their formative years, and show a group that found the magic formula for success from the get-go.

Working Week: Compañeros (Cherry Red)

British jazz trio Working Week found themselves with a surprise hit record in 1985, prompting their label to pressure them into making a quick follow-up. That album, 1986’s Compañeros, was the result–a quickly created album of superb, enjoyable, and politically aware jazz/pop songs.